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Answers tagged psoriatic arthritis: Page 1 of 1
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Tracey from Canada asks: If I have psoriatic arthritis, can I work as a gas bar attendant?

The treatment goal for any inflammatory arthritis is to reach remission.  Those in remission should be able to participate in all their normal activities, including work.  Before reaching remission, patients should listen to their bodies.  If it hurts when you are doing something, it is important not to ignore that.  However, that line of what is too much is going to be different for everyone.  The important thing to know is that being active is not going to make the underlying disease worse.  In fact, exercise in moderation is considered a positive step for those with inflammatory arthritis.

Q:

Natasha from India asks: Can HIV cause arthritis?

HIV, or Human Immunodeficiency Virus, is a virus that affects the immune system.  In some individuals infected with HIV, it can present with musculoskeletal or rheumatic diseases, ranging from fibromyalgia, HIV-related arthritis, vasculitis or psoriatic arthritis.  For most of these, treatment of HIV will also effectively treat the arthritis too.

Q:

Daniel from Edmonton asks: My friend has psoriatic arthritis. He is in a lot of pain and is getting treatment to help deal with his condition. One thing he would like to do is start a fitness routine to help. I’m looking for advice on how to help plan and work in a fitness routine that could account for his joint pain.

Great question!  We encourage our patients with inflammatory arthritis to stay active despite having arthritis.  We know that maintaining activity and muscle strength is a positive, and can be an important component of treatment and well being.  Further, activity itself should not make the arthritis worse.  That said, every individual is different and we need to ensure an appropriate balance between remaining active and not causing pain.  Physical therapists with expertise in inflammatory arthritis are often involved in consulting and developing activity plans.  Your rheumatologist should be able to recommend an appropriate physical therapist to you.

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